Tag Archives: images

The Digital Negative

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The Digital Negative by Jeff Schewe, published by Peachpit Press, ISBN: 13 978-0-321-83957-2.

I have just read this book to try to get a better understanding of digital photography.  Schewe is a photographer who has also been working with the boffins at Adobe since the early 1990’s to help develop RAW, Photoshop and more recently Lightroom for photographers from a photographer’s point-of-view.  His books are therefore as close as you can get to finding a first class knowledgable author.  He has published two books ‘The Digital Negative’ and “The Digital Print’ the later I have just began to read.

The Digital Print briefly covers the basic background of how the digital image is made in the camera but drills in to the featured and functions in both RAW and Lightroom that you will use to process your RAW file in to a presentable photo.  This includes a recommended and sensible workflow, background information from the Adobe engineers explaining why certain features work the way they do.  Chapters 4 and 5 a dedicated to Photoshop for advanced editing beyond the capabilities of RAW and Lightroom for those images worth the extra effort.  Chapter 6 covers the recommended workflow from importing pictures from the camera, storing, backing-up, making copies, cataloguing on to developing.  This book does not however cover printing as this is a topic for his second publication.

This is a good book to read, I learned a few new features in Lightroom that I was unaware of and also instructed me in the use of RAW that I am unfamiliar with as I have only used Lightroom so far.  Lightroom was was developed with a lot of the features from RAW and both will talk to one another but changes made in one will alter the other’s parameters and this is a useful thing to be aware of if you use both RAW and Lightroom.  If you want a better understanding of Lightroom, RAW and Photoshop this ids the book to read.  This is not however a detailed book for Photoshop it covers the topics that most photographers need but doesn’t look at all the magic tricks possible in Photoshop.  This is a book intended to help the modern photographer become confident and proficient developing digital photographs to a point that they can print or advance to higher levels of editing using Photoshop and plug-ins.  Not too technically challenging and easy to read and fairly easy to understand without an engineering degree.

A very good book that I would recommend.

Exercise – Colours into tones in black-and-white

In this exercise, I created a still life using sweets, modelling clay and drinking straws laid on my grey card that I use for manually setting the white balance. The object of this exercise is to use colour filters when converting a colour image to black and white to improve the tone and contrast of the black and white picture. This can be achieved with digital photography by using the colour filter options in Photoshop or Lightroom by adding or subtracting the colour values on the control sliders found in the greyscales functions, available to both of these programs. These features simulates in a more controllable way the adding of a coloured filter to the end of a lens on a camera when photographing with black and white film.

I began this exercise by using my grey card to set the white balance for my camera, I then I set up my still-life with the camera set on a tripod positioned over the subject. I used my 105mm lens, manually focused and set to aperture priority, ISO 100 and I used a cable remote to trip the camera.

First image remains as shot in colour.
Second altered in Photoshop with the greyscale function with no filter adjustments.
Third, fourth, fifth and sixth images all adjusted in Photoshop with one filter raised to simulate a coloured filter over the lens but with the other primary colour sliders lowered to adjust tone and contrast.

Original_colour-resized
Apart from sharpening this image has been untouched and simply converted to JPEG.

Original.
Photoshop – Filters – Camera Raw filter – HSL/Greyscale – tick box “Convert to Greyscale”.
Original_grey_scale-resized
This image has been simply converted to the grey scale in Photoshop without any adjustments to the colour filter sliders which were set to the following default settings:
RED – +7, Orange – +2, Yellow – 0, Greens – -13, Aquas – -22 Blues – +5, Purples – +5,
Magentas – +7.

Red filter.
Adding_red_filter_and_reducing_green_blue_yellow-resized
Filter sliders:
RED – +100, Orange – -27, Yellow – -36, Greens – -41, Aquas – -22 Blues – -69, Purples – +5,
Magentas – +7.

Yellow filter.
Adding_yellow _filter_and_reducing_green_blue_red-resized
Filter sliders:
RED – -42, Orange – -8, Yellow – +11, Greens – -19, Aquas – -22 Blues – -23, Purples – +5,
Magentas – +7.

Adding_green _filter_and_reducing_yellow_blue_red-resized
Filter sliders:
RED – -49, Orange – -21, Yellow – -33, Greens – +78, Aquas – -22 Blues – -13, Purples – +5,
Magentas – +7.

Adding_blue _filter_and_reducing_yellow_green_red-resized
Filter sliders:
RED – -12, Orange – -29, Yellow – -33, Greens – -77, Aquas – -22 Blues – +100, Purples – +5,
Magentas – +7.

By playing with these colour filters in the grey scale I have been able to alter the appearance of all the items on the grey background. However, the grey background itself, has remained constant in all the images.

Exercise – Balance

In this exercise, I am looking at the theory of balance in composition and I have taken six images from my photo library that I think have some elements of balance which I have indicated on the photos and also added a drawing of scales to suggest which form of balance ratio they represent.

Balance-1a

Balance-2a

 

 

 

Balance-5a Falcrum-1

The above images all have a large subject close to the centre and a smaller object opposite nearer the edge; so similar to the balancing of two objects of different weights on a fulcrum, as illustrated.

Balance-3-resized-a

Falcrum-3The above images suggest the balancing of three focal points one in the middle and two at equal distances on either side, as illustrated by the diagram.

Balance-4-resized-aFalcrum-2
This last image roughly illustrates a balance of two equally sized and space subjects either side of the fulcrum.

Exercise – Focal lengths and different viewpoints – for camera with variable focal length (with a zoom or interchangeable lenses)

 

50mmStandardFocal

In this exercise I have looked at the change of prospective of a given subject when photographing it using different focal lengths at different view points.   This 50mm focal length image illustrates the position and distance from my chosen subject at my starting point.  I chose to use an old falling down building and fitted my 55-300mm DX zoom lens and set it to it’s longest length of 300mm @ 1.5 DX ratio giving the equivalent of 450mm on my full frame sensor.
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I then changed lenses to a 24mm short focal length prime lens and walked towards the wooden building until I could fill the subject in my viewfinder. The distance was too long to measure with my 100ft tape; so I simply paced out the distance which was 110 paces about 110 meters from the position I took my first photo from and I was only 6 meters from the subject.
24mmMinimumFocal-resized
By changing the viewpoint the perspective also changes, in these two images the mood of the pictures alters from just a tumbling down wooden hut in a field to a dangerous and derelict structure in what now appears to be a rubbish tip. Thus the choice of viewpoints and focal length can make a great deal of difference when the composition.